Could You Be Suffering From Candida?

candida overgrowth, digestion, IBS, celiac, colitis

Candida Overgrowth (Or Candida Albicans)

The weather is finally warming up. For most of us this means that plenty of get togethers and an abundance of decadent food and drinks are right around the corner. For those of you struggling with digestion issues, however, just thinking about the food and beverages probably has your stomach churning. Digestive disorders can take the fun out of our most enjoyable moments. They don’t have to however. The faster we can pinpoint the cause, the sooner you can enjoy life normally again.

One disorder that has been getting a lot of attention lately is candida overgrowth or candida albicans, its official term. Candida is a type of yeast, or fungus, that is found naturally in the body. For the most part when the bacteria in your body is balanced, candida is not a cause for concern. However, if you are living with an overgrowth of candida or a lack of good bacteria in your gut, you may experience one or a number of symptoms that can wreak havoc on your body and spoil the fun at your future gatherings.

Digestion, IBS, celiac, colitis

Symptoms and Causes of Candida

Symptoms of candida can vary, but include anxiety, depression, yeast infections, diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating, foggy thinking, fatigue, and skin issues. Like most ailments candida overgrowth can make you feel terrible. If you find yourself enjoying a couple of beers or other delights this season only to be followed by bloating and digestive discomfort, you may be suffering from candida.

Other common symptoms of candida include severe allergies, sugar cravings, and respiratory problems. Whether you are experiencing one or a few of these issues, candida can truly interfere with your quality of life.

So, what causes candida overgrowth? Eating a standard American diet that includes a lot of carbohydrates and highly refined foods is one of the many causes of candida. Candida feeds off of sugar and processed foods, allowing it to grow and take over your intestinal tract. Another cause of candida overgrowth includes the heavy use of antibiotics, which may have killed off the good bacteria while treating the bad. Birth control pills, stress and even chemotherapy are additional common causes.

Natural Treatment for Candida?

If you suspect that you may be suffering from candida, one of the simplest things that you can do is to change your diet. Eat a diet without sugar or yeast and full of fresh produce and quality protein.

Candida cleanses and diets are currently being marketed everywhere. Some cleanses include the use of probiotics. Although these diets may be beneficial to some candida sufferers, they might not work for everyone. The best thing to do is to work with your physician to determine what will work for you. This could save you money and possible disappointment.

Given the varying degrees of symptoms, candida affects its victims in many different ways.

Diagnosis

Sometimes candida overgrowth can appear visually on the tongue. If you take a look at your tongue and notice white coating it is likely that you have candida overgrowth. However, the only way to know is to get tested by a doctor.

Many candida overgrowth symptoms can be vague. Therefore, it can be hard to determine whether you are actually dealing with candida. Testing will help you determine and confirm whether candida is the true cause of your discomfort.

At Balanced Care we offer specific testing in order to find out whether or not you are truly suffering from candida overgrowth. If it turns out that you have other ailments but have misdiagnosed yourself as suffering from candida, this could potentially lead to more health problems. Testing positive, we will use natural remedies for candida or yeast overgrowth that are best for you.

 

naturopath, natural medicine, holistic, edina, woodbury

Gluten-Free Veggie Pasta: 5-Step Recipe

gluten-free veggie pasta

Do you struggle to find something to cook that your entire family will like, especially if someone has food allergies or sensitivities? If you are looking for something that is simple and tasty, try this gluten-free veggie pasta!

In an effort to find something to cook for my guy, I decided to try this recipe. I love pasta don’t get me wrong, but it is usually high in carbs and dairy. This recipe is vegan, dairy and gluten-free, but high in carbs. You can’t win them all, right? Add lentils, beans, or grass-fed ground beef to increase the protein content of this meal.

Ingredients

Gluten free pasta

1 large gluten-free tomato sauce (with no added sugar)

1/2 Fresh onion

1 Red pepper

1 small carton of mushrooms

1/2 asparagus bunch

Fresh basil

Olive oil

1/2 tsp salt and pepper

1 tsp Italian seasoning

2 garlic cloves

 

Directions

1. Cook gluten-free noodles according to the box. Be careful not to over-cook to prevent them from becoming mushy. I chose spiral noodles, but angel hair or bow tie would work.

2. Cut veggies – Julienne the pepper and quarter the mushrooms. Chop onions into quarter-inch squares. Break off the end of the asparagus at the natural break, discard the end, and chop remainder in half. Remove basil leaves from stem and chop into smaller pieces. I used about 1.5 bunches of the basil.

3. Saute onions and garlic in olive oil over medium heat until they begin to brown. Add in remaining vegetables, salt, pepper, and italian seasoning. Cook for about 5-8 minutes or until almost cooked through. Note: I used salt free tomato sauce and added about 1 tsp of salt into the veggies. 

4. Add in tomato sauce and let simmer for 5 minutes with the pan cover on.

5. Add noodles to veggie mix and serve immediately. Leftovers are great for lunch the next day!

And that’s it! 5 easy steps to gluten-free veggie pasta.

Optional: Add ground meat for those meat lovers.

Pasta, healthy, gluten free, dairy free

 

Vegetarian Lentil Soup To-Go

vegetarian, soup, healthy, holistic, weight loss, hormones, PCOS

vegetarian, soup, healthy, holistic, weight loss, hormones, PCOS

 

Do you struggle to find something quick and easy to bring to work for lunch? So do I! What does one do when they have loads of CSA veggies, little time, and a busy schedule? Turn on some good tunes and make a veggie lentil soup!! Duh. Make this on Sunday and you will have lunch for the week and then some. Throw the left-overs in the freezer for a night when you don’t have time to cook dinner or grab it on your way out the door in the morning.

Lentils provide protein and fiber while the veggies are packed with vitamins and minerals. There is a hefty amount of onions and garlic to keep your immune system strong during the cold and flu seasons.

Only 1 cup of chopped collard greens has 300% of your Vitamin A, 60% of Vitamin C, 27% of calcium, and 1000% of Vitamin K for your daily value (%DV) needed!! Wow, that is impressive! See this recipe for a delicious collard green and kale recipe.

Tip: Be sure to store your soup in glassware especially if it is still warm. Use a mason jar to prevent spillage!

Vegetarian, dairy-free, healthy, recipe, soup, lentil

Ingredients:

2 tomatoes chopped
1 Rutabaga chopped
1 Green pepper chopped
1/2 yellow onion chopped
1 yellow squash chopped
1 large leek sliced
1 bunch of collard greens chopped
3 celery sticks chopped
32 ounces vegetable broth
1 tbsp chopped garlic
3 sprigs fresh rosemary chopped
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 tsp Penzy spice – get creative, I used their Mural of Flavor and Italian
Water to add as needed
1 tbsp olive oil
1 cup almost cooked lentils

Soup, lentil

Add ingredients to large crock-pot. Add water or additional vegetable broth to the consistency you desire. Cook on low for 8-10 hours. Enjoy!

 

 Have a Happy Halloween!

~ Dr. Katie

Naturopathic Doctor in Woodbury and Edina, Minnesota

Am I “Normal”?!

Vegetables

Vegetables

Have you ever wondered if ________ is normal? I get asked this question a lot! Within the areas of women’s health, we spend a lot of time talking about disease, illness, and symptoms, but what about defining what “normal” is? What about your menstrual cycle, bowel movements, and nutrition? Keep in mind that we are all different. What is normal for one person, may not be normal for another. It also comes down to what you are willing to put up with. Some women have a very strong pain tolerance and will just ‘deal’ with it, while others will spend hours on google searching for a cure.

Disclaimer: Guys, sorry. This one is for the ladies. (Women’s Health)

1. Stress

Stress is a normal part of life, we all have it. The difference is the ways we manage the stress and how it affects us. Exercise, yoga, reading a book, spending time with loved ones, and meditation are just a few things people can do to relieve stress. Stress can often come with anxiety and/or depression which brings us into that “abnormal” category and can be treated with homeopathy.

2. Menstrual cycle

A normal cycle is 21 – 35 days and will last between 3-7 days. Cycles are measured from the first day of your menses to the first day of your menses the next month. This might change if you are on certain types of hormonal contraceptives.

3. PMS

Most women experience PMS the week before their period that is normal. The symptoms should dissipate by the first or second day of your menses and should not begin more than 1 week before your menses. You should be able to function normally during this time. Bloating, moodiness, cramps, cravings, and fatigue are just a few PMS symptoms that are normal. It becomes abnormal when it interferes with your daily life or is causing you significant distress. Staying home because you are in excruciating pain or are afraid you will bleed through your dress pants may be normal for you, but it doesn’t mean you have to suffer. I can offer treatments to ease the most problematic PMS symptoms and determine if there is something more serious going on like PCOS or endometriosis.

4. Bone density

Bone density normally increases during your younger years and can decrease especially after menopause. Estrogen is protective to our bones; therefore during menopause when estrogen levels decrease, our bone density can decrease as well. Having a bone density scan (DEXA) at the beginning of menopause can help determine whether you are maintaining, building, or losing bone during menopause. I can help you prevent bone loss with the proper supplementation.

5.  Menopause

I hate to break it to you, but this is a normal part of life. Even those hot flashes are normal. However, this doesn’t mean that you have to suffer. Naturopathic medicine can keep you feeling like your younger self with herbs and nutrition.

6. Bowel Movements

Yes, that’s right I am talking about poop. 1-4 bowel movements per day is normal. When you look in the toilet it should be well-formed, in 1-3 pieces, and sink to the bottom. The color will depend on what you are eating but the green to brown range is normal

7. Metabolism

We have all heard that our metabolism slows down as we age. While this might be true, it doesn’t mean that you give up. Change is normal, but maintaining a healthy diet and doing regular exercise (including weight-bearing exercise) can make this transition less noticeable.

8. Love

Totally normal. I hope you do lots of it.

9. Healthy food

Making healthy food choices is a normal way to live your life. A healthy, nutritious diet can become the norm at your home if it’s not already. How can you start today? Increase the amount of veggies you eat every day! Still unsure of how to improve your diet? Make an appointment to come see me for a diet plan specifically for you.

10. Naturopathy

Naturopathic medicine should be a normal part of your healing journey and can help prevent and treat symptoms or diseases that are “abnormal”, or simply help improve your lifestyle with nutrition and nutrients.

Wondering if something you’re experiencing is “normal”? Send me a message or call for a free 15 minute women’s health consultation!

Gluten Intolerance and Candida: What’s the Connection?

Gluten

Gluten

One question that is starting to rear its head is this: What is the connection between gluten intolerance and Candida overgrowth. Why is this question being asked now? Because studies are showing that Candida overgrowth and Gluten intolerance appear to be showing up together.

If you are concerned that Gluten intolerance might be connected with your frequent vaginal infections or oral thrush, visit the professionals at Balanced Care and find the answers, and help, you are looking for.

Treating candida overgrowth is only part of the problem. Eating gluten-free snacks without knowing if gluten is the issue is a waste of time. Read on and see what naturopathic doctors are doing to find the connection and treat their patients, naturally, for gluten intolerance and Candida overgrowth.

Below you will read what one naturopathic doctor, or ND, does when he begins to work with a client who is having problems with Candida overgrowth.

Gluten Intolerance and Candida: What’s the Connection?

One of the first things I do when treating patients with Candida is put them on a strict anti-fungal diet. The goal is to restore immune function while eliminating any potential allergens, later adding foods back one at a time to find out which cause reactions. It’s not too surprising to find that a lot of my patients, while struggling to treat their yeast infections, also become gluten intolerant.

Why Do Gluten Intolerances Develop in Patients with Candida?

Candida

As you already know, a wide variety of commonly used grains – like barley, wheat, rye, oats, and spelt, (amongst others), contain gluten. Gluten is a protein, but it’s one that is very difficult to digest. Therefore, if the intestines aren’t functioning optimally, the process of trying to digest gluten can cause damage to the intestinal tract.

Those who are suffering from Candida already have desensitized immune systems and their intestines are already damaged by the Candida Albicans organism itself. The problem is that the Candida Albicans cell contains a protein that allows it to attach to the cell walls within the intestines.

This protein in Candida is very similar to the protein in gluten. When the Candida cells attach to the intestinal walls, change, and send out new spores, the immune system tries to respond. It not only begins attacking the protein in the Candida cell, but it begins to attack the protein in the gluten cells.

In other words, your immune system eventually gets to the point where it can’t tell the difference between the Candida and gluten proteins. The immune system goes into overdrive and you eventually begin to have allergic reactions to gluten products. Your body then tries to develop an auto-immune response, like celiac disease.

In short, there is always an explanation for relatively healthy people suddenly developing allergies and food sensitivities to items that never, ever bothered them in the past.

Treating Gluten Intolerance and Candida

While treating my clients with Candida, I often ask them to avoid all gluten products. I ask them to instead lean towards safer grains like quinoa, millet, buckwheat, and amaranth. A lot of Candida diet programs stress avoiding all grains, but I find that there are only a few very extreme cases (maybe 2% of all I’ve seen) where avoiding grains altogether is a necessity. As long as you’re avoiding gluten, usually for several months, you should respond well to your anti-Candida regime.

Focusing on Quinoa

Focusing on Quinoa

If I had to choose one grain for you to focus on, I’d pick quinoa. Quinoa looks like a little white seed and it puffs up a bit when cooked. Unlike most other grains, quinoa is considered a complete protein because it contains all of the essential amino acids your body needs on a daily basis. It’s also a fantastic source of fiber, which is also incredibly important while you’re working to cure your yeast infection.

Quinoa is pretty versatile, too. If you’re cooking it as a grain, you’ll want to wash it thoroughly first to get the soapy saponins off before you cook it. Use a fine mesh strainer or a cheesecloth and run cold water over and through the grains. If you forget, your cooked quinoa may and up tasting pretty soapy.

Quinoa is great served with vegetables, cooked and eaten like you would eat oatmeal, or mixed with beans. You can also get quinoa flour and make your own kinds of pasta.

A lot of my Candida patients find, after completely eradicating their yeast infections, that they are no longer sensitive to gluten. Many go back to eating gluten grains, in moderation, while others simply prefer non-gluten grains for health or preference reasons.

There will be exceptions to the rule, of course, and some people are genuinely allergic to gluten and will have to avoid it forever. You’ll still be amazed at the number of people who can reverse the immune response once their bodies are healed!

Candida Overgrowth Does Not Have to be Forever

As you see, a gluten-free diet can give some relief to the person who is suffering from Candida overgrowth. While removing gluten from your diet may be helpful, making sure the friendly bacteria are at work in your lower digestive system is extremely important.

If you are using prescribe antibiotics, engaging in the use of alcoholic beverages, anxious, or stressed out, it may be time to give the professionals at Balanced Care a call. Health is not about fixing one problem but being healthy and balance physically, spiritually, and emotionally.

If Candida overgrowth is disturbing your life, it’s time to make the call that will give you the health you are looking for.

Should I Be Gluten Free?!

Gluten free, health, nutrition, naturopathic, digestion, food allergy, food sensitivity

Gluten, gluten free, health, nutrition, holistic, digestion, allergies, celiac

“Gluten Free”, “Celiac Friendly”, “Gluten Sensitive”, and “May contain Gluten” are a few phrases that are becoming more common in society today. But is this just another fad? Or is gluten a real problem?! First, let’s talk about what gluten is and the symptoms it may cause. Then I will discuss the difference between Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac Disease. And finally, what to do about it.

What is gluten and where do I find it? 

Gluten is a protein found naturally in all forms of wheat including barley and rye. Grains need the elasticity gluten provides to help it rise while keeping its shape.  Starch and binders often contain gluten as well and are used in various other products. Even the ‘paleos’ out there aren’t safe from gluten!

Gluten is not just found in grains, but also alcoholic beverages, cosmetics, some medications and supplements, soy sauce, lunch meat, imitation bacon and  seafood, sauces, and even brown rice syrup can contain gluten. Your friend, family member, neighbor, or even you might be sensitive to gluten, yet it is hidden everywhere!

Gluten has only been in the American diet for the past 300 years. May sound like a long time, but in terms of evolution, it is very short. In addition to this being “new” in our diet, it is also found more commonly in our foods. Now 90% of American foods contain gluten! Wow. Maybe too much of a something, isn’t such a good thing?

What is the difference between celiac disease and gluten sensitivity?

1/133 people in the US have the genetic condition, celiac disease. It is an autoimmune condition of the intestines. The immune system reacts to the gluten proteins found in food. This immune reaction results in injury and inflammation inside the intestines. Diagnosing celiac disease requires blood testing and an intestinal biopsy to confirm.

Delayed growth, poor appetite, and irritability are common symptoms seen in children. Adults might experience diarrhea, bloating, fatigue, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and/or infertility. Celiac disease is also linked to other autoimmune conditions including Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, graves disease, diabetes mellitus type I, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and Addison’s disease. The treatment for celiac disease is the elimination of all gluten from the diet, a matter of life or death in some cases. Even 1/8 of a cracker can continue causing inflammation and damage to the intestine.

You might be wondering why avoiding gluten makes you feel better, yet you don’t have celiac disease. Well, you can still have a sensitivity to gluten. There are thousands of people avoiding gluten and have noticed that they have more energy, lose weight, and their digestion improves.

Gluten sensitivity is the same as a delayed food allergy where the symptoms may not present for 48 hours after ingesting gluten. Body wide inflammation can result in a variety of different reactions. The symptoms of a sensitivity are generally less severe than celiac disease and may include fatigue, chronic colds, skin problems, asthma, abdominal pain, arthritis, and/or ADHD. One way to figure out if you are sensitive to gluten is to avoid it. If you feel better, it is likely that you are sensitive to gluten or have celiac in rare cases. Blood testing is also available.

Gluten free, health, nutrition, naturopathic, digestion, food allergy, food sensitivity

Eating Gluten Free

People generally report losing weight and feeling better when on a Gluten free diet. I believe this is partly due to potential food allergies, but avoiding gluten also naturally results in a cleaner diet. A gluten-free diet requires diligent label reading – check out the ingredients in your products, you might be surprised! The good news? Veggies, fruit, brown rice, quinoa, eggs, grass-fed beef, free range chicken, nuts, and beans are just a few of the foods that are naturally gluten free! These are much better choices than bread, cereal, pasta, microwave dinners, cookies, crackers, and frozen pizza. Do you see my point?! Everyone can handle varying amounts of gluten in their diet, it’s up to you to determine how much YOUR body can tolerate.

Still aren’t sure whether you have celiac or gluten sensitivity? I can help you determine if you have a gluten sensitivity or celiac disease. I can also help you incorporate this often big change with more information.

Katie Corazzo, naturopath, naturopathic doctor, holistic, homeopath

How is your DIGESTIVE HEALTH?

digestive health, stomach pain, IBS, diarrhea, constipation

stomach pain, Digestion, IBS, diarrhea, constipation, reflux, stomach, probiotic, holistic

Do you ever have digestive problems? Have you talked with your doctor about them? Has your doctor every discussed you diet and what you should be eating to improve your digestive health?

If you have digestive problems and haven’t found relief, Naturopathic Medicine can help! I believe that our diet greatly impacts not only our health, but our digestion and the way we feel. I see patients who begin to make small dietary improvements that have a huge impact on the way they feel. In addition to feeling better and losing weight, improving your diet can reduce your risk of heart disease by 25%!

Everything we eat touches and interacts with our mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine; therefore it would make sense that what you eat impacts how you feel, right?! When we bombard our digestive tract with greasy or processed foods it creates inflammation in our body. The result? Leaky gut, food allergies, autoimmune disease, feeling tired after a meal, nausea after eating, headaches, upset stomach, IBS, and the list goes on! The good news? You don’t have to suffer any longer! Naturopathic Medicine works to uncover the cause of your digestive health problems and treat the issues that arise. Call or email me today to begin your journey toward improved digestion!